Responsive Web Design
  • Posted by Patrick Lauzon, Director of IT on July 26, 2012

    I’ve just completed the first iteration of our website done utilizing responsive design technologies.  For those that may be unaware, a responsive website is one which adapts to the viewing device so that it provides a predictable viewing experience.  This is where the net is headed.  I’ve read recently that by 2016, 60% of the net’s traffic will be on smart devices (phones and tablets primarily).  Add to that the fact that Netflix presently accounts for nearly 30% of all web traffic and there is not (will not be) much traffic on the web based on a desktop viewing device.  This necessitates a complete re-think of how websites are designed.

    This site is now designed such that it “scales” to fit the device.  It hides and reveals elements in varied locations predicated upon the viewing device.  As such, it does require a “modern web browser” (sorry MS, IE just doesn’t cut it, except possibly IE9). Do yourself a favor, download Firefox or Chrome and don’t look back.  It also requires the use of javascript.  At this point in time, the use of javascript is almost unavoidable.  Between the use of a modern browser and javascript, the web has become quite interesting.  Things that once required Flash no longer necessitate such and can actually be performed natively by the browser and HTML5.

    I’ve done my best to maintain the look and feel (the branding, if you will) of the desktop-rendered site.  There are, and need be, some subtle differences.  Many times there is a distinct need for bottom-based navigation on mobile devices so that the user is not forced to scroll “all the way back to the top” of the page.  In this instance, I’ve made our logo a “to the top of the page button.”

    There remains a great deal to be done:  tidying up all the styling so that things have appropriate “whitespace”; “widgetizing” my HTML in ExpressionEngine so that things don’t have to be repeated throughout the site. But it does work and performs quite admirably I believe. So grab your phone or tablet and check us out.


    Tags: · responsive web design



Portfolio » CorporateEducationGovernmentHealthcareHospitalityOther
Responsive Web Design
  • Posted by Patrick Lauzon, Director of IT on July 26, 2012

    I’ve just completed the first iteration of our website done utilizing responsive design technologies.  For those that may be unaware, a responsive website is one which adapts to the viewing device so that it provides a predictable viewing experience.  This is where the net is headed.  I’ve read recently that by 2016, 60% of the net’s traffic will be on smart devices (phones and tablets primarily).  Add to that the fact that Netflix presently accounts for nearly 30% of all web traffic and there is not (will not be) much traffic on the web based on a desktop viewing device.  This necessitates a complete re-think of how websites are designed.

    This site is now designed such that it “scales” to fit the device.  It hides and reveals elements in varied locations predicated upon the viewing device.  As such, it does require a “modern web browser” (sorry MS, IE just doesn’t cut it, except possibly IE9). Do yourself a favor, download Firefox or Chrome and don’t look back.  It also requires the use of javascript.  At this point in time, the use of javascript is almost unavoidable.  Between the use of a modern browser and javascript, the web has become quite interesting.  Things that once required Flash no longer necessitate such and can actually be performed natively by the browser and HTML5.

    I’ve done my best to maintain the look and feel (the branding, if you will) of the desktop-rendered site.  There are, and need be, some subtle differences.  Many times there is a distinct need for bottom-based navigation on mobile devices so that the user is not forced to scroll “all the way back to the top” of the page.  In this instance, I’ve made our logo a “to the top of the page button.”

    There remains a great deal to be done:  tidying up all the styling so that things have appropriate “whitespace”; “widgetizing” my HTML in ExpressionEngine so that things don’t have to be repeated throughout the site. But it does work and performs quite admirably I believe. So grab your phone or tablet and check us out.


    Tags: · responsive web design



Portfolio » CorporateEducationGovernmentHealthcareHospitalityOther
Portfolio » CorporateEducationGovernmentHealthcareHospitalityOther